Supergoop vs La Roche-Posay | Which Sunscreen Is Better?

written by: Tom Qiao
last update: February 20, 2024

As a skincare editor who regularly tests sunscreens, Supergoop and La Roche-Posay are two of the most popular brands I get asked about. Both offer broad-spectrum sun protection, but have […]

As a skincare editor who regularly tests sunscreens, Supergoop and La Roche-Posay are two of the most popular brands I get asked about. Both offer broad-spectrum sun protection, but have noticeable differences when it comes to texture, cost, ingredients, and skin type suitability. Here’s my take on how these mineral and chemical SPFs compare.

Ingredients

The star ingredients differ significantly between these sunscreen brands. Supergoop uses zinc oxide and titanium dioxide minerals to deflect UV rays. Their Unseen Sunscreen also uniquely features red algae to guard against blue light from devices. Meanwhile, La Roche-Posay takes a chemical filter approach using avobenzone, homosalate, octisalate, and octocrylene. There’s no right or wrong here. Minerals suit sensitive skin better for some, while others prefer chemical filters that rub in more cleanly. One advantage to Supergoop is they don’t use oxybenzone, an ingredient toxic to coral reefs now banned in locations like Hawaii.

Texture

These brands are practically opposites when it comes to sunscreen texture and finish. As a chemical SPF, La Roche-Posay Anthelios Ultra-Light melts effortlessly into skin with no white cast. It’s easy to layer under makeup with a shine-free matte finish. Supergoop’s mineral formulas have a thicker, almost silicone-like texture that richly hydrates. While liquids like their Unseen Sunscreen feel weightless for the body, the zinc oxide still leaves a demi-matte glow better suited to no-makeup days.

Cost

Like most mineral sunscreens, Supergoop sits at the higher end of the SPF price spectrum. Their popular Unseen Sunscreen retails for $34 for 1.7 oz, putting the cost per oz around $20. By contrast, you can pick up a 1.7 oz bottle of La Roche-Posay Anthelios for $30 total, or under $18 per oz. So if you’ll be lathering up liberally each day, La Roche-Posay stretches your dollar further. However, Supergoop fans argue their rich formulas reduce the amount of product needed per application.

Skin Type Suitability

Those with sensitive skin prone to redness, itching, and burning may fare better with zinc-based options like Supergoop. The mineral particles sit atop skin vs soaking in, making them less irritating. The tradeoff is a visible white hue and thicker texture. Meanwhile, the chemical UV filters in La Roche-Posay Anthelios absorb quickly with no white cast, making them the optimal choice for darker complexions. Oily skin types may also prefer La Roche-Posay’s weightless, shine-free finish.

In summary, Think of La Roche-Posay for a budget-friendly chemical sunscreen that blends beautifully into most skin tones and under makeup. Go for Supergoop’s mineral formulas if you have reactive, sensitive skin and prefer asmoothing primer-like texture. Both provide superb UV protection—it just comes down to formula preference and cost considerations like usage volume. Let me know if you have any other SPF questions!

Article written by Tom Qiao

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