Derma E Scar Gel Review 2019 | Fade Your Scars Now

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Derma E Scar Gel Review

If you’re looking for a Derma E Scar Gel review, you’re in the right place!

Essentially, Derma E Scar Gel is a cheaper version of Mederma. Both products use a key ingredient called onion extract for scar treatment.

However, clinical studies on onion extract are somewhat mixed. (1)

I’ve used Mederma before with good results (see my full review here) but quite frankly I’d recommend that you buy a good quality silicone gel instead.

That’s because silicone is clinically proven to reduce the appearance of scars from surgery (including C-section), accidents, cuts & scrapes, burns, and even acne. (1)

My top recommendation for a silicone gel is NewGel+ (I use it myself). It’s a great scar gel with 100% silicone and vitamin E that balances effectiveness with affordability.

Keep reading for my full review of Derma E Scar Gel!

Related: Derma E Scar Gel vs Mederma

Derma E Scar Gel Review

Our Score: 4/5

A cheap onion extract gel with panthenol (comparable to Mederma).

PROS

  • Reduces scar height & size
  • Restores normal skin color
  • Panthenol (hydrating)
  • Excellent reviews
  • Super affordable

CONS

  • Results require patience
  • Mixed clinical research

To Keep A Long Story Short...

Derma E Scar Gel is a scar product manufactured by Derma E, a skincare company that started out as a small health food store.

Its Derma E Scar Gel is a very close duplicate of Mederma Advanced Scar Gel, which features the key ingredient onion extract.

Clinical research into onion extract is not yet conclusive, which is why I recommend using silicone gels or sheets instead.

Silicone is clinically proven and recommended by the International Advisory Panel on Scar Management for hypertrophic scars and keloids.

My top pick for a silicone gel is NewGel+ (I use it myself).

On the other hand, onion extract gels like Mederma and Derma E are cheaper because they don’t use expensive medical grade silicone.

In fact, Derma E is one of the cheapest scar gels (~$7 per oz) compared to Mederma (~$16 per oz) and NewGel+ (~$40 per oz).

So if you want a more affordable alternative to Mederma with similar ingredients, Derma E Scar Gel is a great option.

But if you want the best results for your scars, I recommend using a silicone gel like NewGel+ or silicone sheet like ScarAway.

What is Derma E Scar Gel?

Derma E is an onion extract based gel that works on hypertrophic scars, keloids, surgical scars (such as C-section), and scars from trauma, burns, or injuries.

Key Features

  • Onion extract (same as Mederma)
  • Panthenol (deep hydration)
  • Glycerin (hydration)
  • Comes in 2.0 oz tub
  • Requires 2-3x daily application

Key Benefits

  • Flattens raised scars
  • Reduces skin discoloration
  • Helps prevent scars after surgery
  • Thin, lightweight, easy to apply
  • Affordable

Suitable For

  • Hypertrophic scars
  • Keloids (including on the chest or earlobes)
  • Surgical scars (including C-section)
  • Scars from trauma, burns, or injuries
  • Scars on the face, hands, and other visible areas

How Does Derma E Work?

Onion Extract

Onion extract (allium cepa) has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

Studies show that onion extract can inhibit fibroblasts (cells that produce collagen). This softens raised scars like hypertrophic scars and keloids and may reduce skin discoloration. (2) 

Onion extract also contains quercetin, a plant flavonoid that inhibits collagen production. (3)

The clinical evidence, however, is not yet conclusive:

  • One study reported no difference between onion extract and Vaseline (4)
  • Other studies reported positive results with onion extract (5, 6, 7)
  • One of these studies was funded by Merz (manufacturer of Mederma) (7)

Panthenol

Panthenol is a common ingredient in skincare products. It’s a derivative of pantothenic acid (vitamin B5).

Panthenol aids wound healing and improves skin hydration and elasticity. It can also alleviate redness, inflammation, and irritation.

Glycerin

Glycerin is another common ingredient in skincare products. It’s a sponge-like chemical that attracts water to skin to improve hydration.

Derma E Scar Gel Reviews

Among the positive reviews, people claimed Derma E reduced the appearance of their scars, including scar size, scar height, and skin redness.

Among the negative reviews, people noted that Derma E didn’t provide any benefits.

I find that most people don’t use silicone gels long enough to see the desired results. In my experience, it takes between 3-6 months before you’ll notice any significant improvements. 

As with all skincare products, your mileage may vary (YMMV).

"After a months use, my scars have diminished to small unnoticeable specks."

Wow!!! I tried this product because I was referred to it for my scarring. I thought, "Ya right", I didn't have much confidence in DermaE Scar gel. Well, I used it for a month and it had made such a difference with my skin!!! I have a rare autoimmune disease that attacks my skin and I had so many scars that just didn't want to heal, Derma E Scar Gel Works! I can't say enough about how much I love this product. If you have a tendency to scar from acne or other reasons, give it a try.

Diane Thomas

"Great gel. Its light, not sticky. It does work with daily use. Works on Acne scars & sunburns."

I’ve been using this gel for a couple of years now, and love it. It helps tremendously with Acne scars (or any scars for that matter) with consistency, & it does NOT cause more breakouts from using it. It’s smells great (kind of like limes), and soaks right into the skin, like a watery feel. It also works GREAT on Sunburns.

Shea21

The Bottom-Line

Derma E Scar Gel is an effective scar product that uses onion extract (same as Mederma).

It helps flatten old scars and prevent new scars from forming.

Due to the mixed clinical research on onion extract, however, I currently recommend using silicone gels or sheets for scar treatment. 

My top pick for a silicone gel is NewGel+ (I use it myself). It’s an excellent scar gel with 100% silicone and vitamin E that balances effectiveness and affordability.

For large body scars, I recommend a silicone sheet like ScarAway Silicone Scar Sheets.

References

  1. Gold MH, et al. International Advisory Panel on Scar Management. “Updated international clinical recommendations on scar management: part 2–algorithms for scar prevention and treatment.” Dermatological Surgery vol. 40,8 (2014): 825-31. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25068544
  2. Cho JW, et al. “Onion extract and quercetin induce matrix metalloproteinase-1 in vitro and in vivo.” International Journal of Molecular Medicine vol. 25,3 (2010): 347-52. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20127038
  3. Phan TT, et al. “Quercetin inhibits fibronectin production by keloid-derived fibroblasts. Implication for the treatment of excessive scars.” Journal of Dermatological Science vol. 33 (2003): 192–4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14643528
  4. Chung VQ, et al. “Onion extract gel versus petrolatum emollient on new surgical scars: prospective double-blinded study.” Dermatological Surgery vol. 32,2 (2006): 193-7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16442038
  5. Ho WS, et al. “Use of onion extract, heparin, allantoin gel in prevention of scarring in chinese patients having laser removal of tattoos: a prospective randomized controlled trial.” Dermatological Surgery vol. 32,7 (2006): 891-6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16875470
  6. Beuth J, et al. “Safety and efficacy of local administration of contractubex to hypertrophic scars in comparison to corticosteroid treatment. Results of a multicenter, comparative epidemiological cohort study in Germany.” In Vivo vol. 20,2 (2006): 277-83. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16634531
  7. Draelos, Zoe D et al. “A new proprietary onion extract gel improves the appearance of new scars: a randomized, controlled, blinded-investigator study.” The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology vol. 5,6 (2012): 18-24. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3390235/
  8. Gauglitz, Gerd G et al. “Hypertrophic scarring and keloids: pathomechanisms and current and emerging treatment strategies.” Molecular Medicine (Cambridge, Mass.) vol. 17,1-2 (2010): 113-25. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3022978/
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Tom Qiao

I solve skin mysteries using simple science to provide you the best skincare advice!

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